Thesis writing font and size

We encourage you to keep these tips in mind as you revise. While you may be able to employ this advice as you write your first draft, that’s not necessarily always possible. In writing, clarity often comes when you revise, not on your first try. Don’t worry about the passive if that stress inhibits you in getting your ideas down on paper. But do look for it when you revise. Actively make choices about its proper place in your writing. There is nothing grammatically or otherwise “wrong” about using the passive voice. The key is to recognize when you should, when you shouldn’t, and when your instructor just doesn’t want you to. These choices are yours. We hope this handout helps you to make them.

Always allow at least one extra line of space above subheadings, and preferably below as well. Without this extra space, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish headings from text. A heading must never appear alone at the bottom of a page (a “widow”) without at least two lines of text under it. Also keep in mind the conventional wisdom that a unit cannot be divided into a single part, or “you can’t have an A without a B.” If you have only one second-level heading under a given first-level heading, you should probably incorporate it into the text or, if subdivision is really called for, create another second-level heading. Addition- ally, if you have only one appendix, call it simply Appendix, not Appendix A.

Thesis writing font and size

thesis writing font and size

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